about us

Four Rivers Behavioral Health is a private, not-for-profit agency providing comprehensive, integrated mental health, substance abuse and developmental disability services to promote the health and quality of life for consumers in Ballard, Calloway, Carlisle, Fulton, Graves, Hickman, Livingston, Marshall, and McCracken counties. Any individual in need is eligible to receive services without regard to race, religion, disability, national origin, or gender.

Our History

As early as 1962-63, surveys were made throughout the region by the local mental health associations, in an effort to assess the need for mental health services.

Out of that survey and supporting data from other agencies, it was determined that outside resources would have to be secured in order to provide the limited services based on available resources at hand, and took a step forward in 1965 by beginning the formation of the Regional concept and consolidating the efforts of all counties in the Purchase Region. By January 1966, the local mental health association, in consultation with the Kentucky Department of Mental Health, had formed a regional board whose responsibilities in the following months would be to develop operational procedures, policies, establish project objectives and goals, expand mental health services staffing, community education, and to secure the funds required to support the above.

The first Regional Board meeting was held January 27, 1966, and thus the process of planning, developing, and implementing a regional Mental Health Program was fully underway.

In August, 1966, the first staff was employed and the Board instructed him in the October 6, 1966, meeting to submit upon their approval a staffing grant for the region. In January 1967, verbal approval was received from the Department of Mental Health and a final draft of the grant was presented to federal authorities on January 20, 1967. It received final review on the 14th of February, 1967, Chairman Ben Humphreys received a telegram from Congressman Frank A. Stubblefield informing him that the staffing grant had received official federal approval to become effective July 1, 1967. The grant was approved for a five year period with the amount decreasing each year. This was the first time federal, state, and local funds were combined to deliver Mental Health Services in the region.

1963

President John F. Kennedy delivered a message proposing a “bold new approach” to dealing with the problems of mental illness and mental retardation. Congress responded with the passage of the Mental Retardation Facilities and Community Mental Health Center Construction Act, which was signed into law on October 31, 1963 (P.L. 88-164).The law authorized federal grants for construction of public or nonprofit community mental health centers. Monies were allotted to states on a percentage basis of population, extent of need and financial need.Required services included the following components: Inpatient Care, Outpatient Care, Partial Hospitalization, Emergency Care, and Consultation/Education.

1965

The Community Mental Health Centers (CMHC) Act Amendments of 1965, (P.L. 91-211), construction and staffing grants to centers were extended and facilities that served those with alcohol and substance abuse disorders were made eligible to receive these grants. Grants were provided to support the initiation and development of mental health services in poverty-stricken areas. A new program of grants was established to support further development of children’s services.

1966

The first Western Kentucky Regional Mental Health/Mental Retardation Advisory Board, Inc. meeting was held with Ben Humphreys serving as Chair.Consumers in McCracken, Marshall, Graves, Calloway, and Fulton counties soon began receiving services under the direction of Marlow Harston, MD.

Livingston, Ballard, Carlisle, and Hickman counties began receiving limited services.

1973

The Paducah Mental Health Center moves from the Guthrie Building to Lourdes.

1975

The CMHC Act Amendments of 1975 (P.L. 94-63) mandated a more detailed community mental health center definition emphasizing comprehensiveness and accessibility to all persons regardless of ability to pay, through the creation of a community governing board and quality assurance.Required core services expanded from the 1963 levels from 5 to 12, which included the following: Children Services, Elderly Services, Screening Services, Follow-up Care, Transitional Services, Alcohol Abuse Services, Drug Abuse Services.

1980

The Mental Health Systems Act, (P.L. 96-398), restructured the federal community mental health center program by strengthening the linkages between the federal, state, and local governments.Per the Mental Health Systems Act, a litany of grant programs were mandated for the CMHCs to assist the centers in expanding services to meet an array of priority populations including grantsfor the severely mentally ill (SMI) and severely emotionally disturbed (SED) populations, expansion of education and consultation services and increased involvement of the consumer in service and treatment.

Don Fox is hired as the fourth Executive Director.

1981

The Mental Health Systems Act was repealed. In its place, the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health (ADMS) Block Grant was enacted as part of the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981, (P.L. 97-35), which was signed into law on August 13, 1981.This consolidated the alcohol, drug abuse, and mental health programs into a single block grant. States were given wide discretion in implementing and administering this block grant.

1982

The ADMS block grant, the most prominent block grant that applied to CMHCs at the time, decreased federal funding levels by 30 percent.This resulted in dramatic service reductions, and in some cases, elimination of programs within different CMHCs.

1983

MRDD Services were expanded to include Creative Enterprises and Respite Care begins to be provided to families of MR consumers in Western Kentucky.

1987

Congress amended Medicare by increasing outpatient mental health benefits for the first time since the program’s enactment in 1965

1991

Four Rivers Behavioral Health creates programs for SMI Adults and SED Children

1993

Creative Enterprises, the MRDD Office, the Regional Prevention Center and the SED Program began moving into the Hipp Building

1995

The Fuller Center Opens

2002

An in-depth study on co-occurring disorders, mandated under the Children’s Health Act of 2000, was delivered to Congress.President Bush increased funding for Community Health Centers that provided appropriations for the construction of additional centers and offered more services, including behavioral healthcare benefits.

2004

FRBH Corporate Office, Center for Adult Services, and Medical Services move into the newly renovated Broadway location.

2006

The Center for Specialized Children’s Services, Regional Prevention Center, Mental Retardation/Developmental Disability Services, and Creative Enterprises move to new offices at 425 Broadway.

2010

CenterPoint Opens

Our Mission

To provide comprehensive, integrated mental health, substance abuse, and mental retardation-developmental disability services that promote the health and quality of life of our community members.

Our Vision

To inspire confidence and respect as a provider of comprehensive behavioral health care. To be a valued partner in alliances that promote the health and quality of life for our community and its members.

Our Goals

  • Evaluate and plan for the behavioral health needs of our community, per our legislative mandate as the regional planning authority.
  • Provide accessible, effective, and efficient behavioral health services.
  • Advocate for the rights and needs of individuals with behavioral health challenges.
  • Engage in active outreach to assure prevention, early intervention, and coordination of services to reduce the impact of behavioral health disorders for the individuals and community we serve. To continually measure the outcome of the services provided to assure effectiveness, efficiency, and fiscal accountability.

Our Values

Four Rivers Behavioral Health is a private, not-for-profit agency providing comprehensive, integrated mental health, substance abuse and developmental disability services to promote the health and quality of life for consumers in Ballard, Calloway, Carlisle, Fulton, Graves, Hickman, Livingston, Marshall, and McCracken counties. Any individual in need is eligible to receive services without regard to race, religion, disability, national origin, or gender.

Our services will:

  • Protect the dignity and privacy of the individuals served.
  • Be within the financial reach of anyone in need.
  • Be empirically advised and clinically sound.
  • Respond to community diversity through culturally sensitive consumer focused care.
  • Target outcomes that satisfy the consumer and demonstrate program effectiveness.

Our staff will:

  • Be friendly, courteous, and efficient.
  • Observe the highest ethical and practice standards.
  • Respond with empathy and compassion to the needs of the individuals we serve.

Our service sites will:

  • Be accessible to all individuals.
  • Be safe, hospitable and well-organized.
  • Be governed by business practices that are efficient, accountable and honest.

Our management practices will:

  • Promote respect and dignity towards the staff.
  • Encourage continuing professional development.
  • Support staff participation in community activities important to the well-being of our service public.
  • Promote a broad-based partnership of coordinated community care.

Board Information

Board History

As early as 1962-63, surveys were made throughout the region by the local mental health associations, in an effort to assess the need for mental health services.

Out of that survey and supporting data from other agencies, it was determined that outside resources would have to be secured in order to provide the limited services based on available resources at hand, and took a step forward in 1965 by beginning the formation of the Regional concept and consolidating the efforts of all counties in the Purchase Region. By January 1966, the local mental health association, in consultation with the Kentucky Department of Mental Health, had formed a regional board whose responsibilities in the following months would be to develop operational procedures, policies, establish project objectives and goals, expand mental health services staffing, community education, and to secure the funds required to support the above.

The first Regional Board meeting was held January 27, 1966, and thus the process of planning, developing, and implementing a regional Mental Health Program was fully underway.

In August, 1966, the first staff was employed and the Board instructed him in the October 6, 1966, meeting to submit upon their approval a staffing grant for the region. In January 1967, verbal approval was received from the Department of Mental Health and a final draft of the grant was presented to federal authorities on January 20, 1967. It received final review on the 14th of February, 1967, Chairman Ben Humphreys received a telegram from Congressman Frank A. Stubblefield informing him that the staffing grant had received official federal approval to become effective July 1, 1967. The grant was approved for a five year period with the amount decreasing each year. This was the first time federal, state, and local funds were combined to deliver Mental Health Services in the region.

As a part of the history, an outline of those who served as chairperson of the Western Kentucky Regional Mental Health-Mental Retardation Board is as follows:

Board Member   Term Start   Term End  
Dr. Ben Humphreys   1966, January   1968, January  
H. W. Ford, MD   1968, September   1969, September  
David West   1969, September   1970, September  
W. J. Bryan, Jr.   1970, September   1971, September  
James L. Shumaker, M.D.   1971, September   1974, September  
C. C. Lowry   1974, September   1976, September  
Rev. Fred French   1976, September   1977, September  
Dan Akin   1977, September   1978, September  
Ben Humphreys   1978, September   1979, September  
Glenda Cooper   1979, September   1982, September  
Jean Hurt   1982, September   1983, September  
Jeffrey L. Rice, M.D.   1983, September   1984, September  
Nancy Curtis   1984, July   1986, July  
Robert Coleman   1986, September   1990, September  
Rick Johnson   1990, September   1994, September  
Doug Parish   1994, September   1998, September  
Jeff Edwards   1998, September   1999, September  
Rudele Orazine   1999, September   2002, September  
Bill Allbritten, Ph.D   2002, September   2003, September  
Scott Johnston   2003, September   2007, September  
Rudele Orazine   2007, September   2011, December  
Jerry Bebout   2012, January  

Current Board of Directors

Bill Cownie   McCracken County
Olivia Burr   McCracken County
Linda Avery   Calloway County
Phyllis Teeters   Carlisle County
John Thompson   Fulton County
Charles Simpson   McCracken County
Shirley Lanier   McCracken County
Dan Walker   Hickman County
Nancy Conley   Calloway County
Cindy Clemson   Calloway County
Jennifer Lewis   McCracken County
Sheina Murphy   McCracken County
Peggy Meriedith   Ballard County
Jerry Bebout   Livingston County
Patricia Thomas   Graves County
Board Application Board Authority Info